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Chubu

Articles and travel guides on famous and not so famous destinations in the Chūbu Region (中部地方 Chūbu-chihō): Aichi, Fukui, Gifu, Ishikawa, Nagano, Niigata, Shizuoka, Toyama, Yamanashi; divided into three subregions: Hokuriku, Kōshin’etsu, Tōkai

Most Popular

  • Chubu Travel Guide

    The Chūbu Region (中部地方 Chūbu-chihō) is the central part of Japan’s main island Honshū and consists of three subregions, Hokuriku on the Sea of...
  • Nagano Prefecture

    Nagano Prefecture (長野県) is located in central Honshū and borders the prefectures of Niigata, Gunma, Saitama, Yamanashi, Shizuoka, Aichi, Gifu, and...
  • Nagoya Travel Guide

    Nagoya (名古屋市), Japan’s fourth-largest city, is the capital of Aichi Prefecture, located in central Honshū on Ise Bay, as well as the political,...
  • Atsuta Shrine

    Atsuta Shrine (熱田神宮 Atsuta-jingū) is one of the most sacred Shinto shrines in Japan, purportedly second only to Ise-jingū in Mie Prefecture. It is...
  • Kakegawa Castle

    Kakegawa Castle (掛川城 Kakegawa-jō) is a hilltop (hirayama-type) castle located in Kakegawa City in western Shizuoka Prefecture. Listed in the Top...
  • Tokugawa Art Museum

    The Tokugawa Art Museum (徳川美術館 Tokugawa Bijutsukan) is a private museum that opened its gates in 1935 and displays a large collection of artifacts...
  • Aichi Prefecture

    Aichi Prefecture (愛知県) is located in central Honshū and borders the prefectures of Gifu and Nagano prefectures to the north, Shizuoka Prefecture...
  • Osu Kannon

    Officially called Kitanosan Shinpuku-ji Hōshō-in (北野山真福寺宝生院), Ōsu Kannon (大須観音) is a Buddhist temple of the Shingon sect located in Naka Ward,...
  • Nagoya Castle

    Nagoya Castle (名古屋城 Nagoya-jō) was built by Tokugawa Ieyasu in 1609-14 on the site of a smaller castle taken over and renamed by Oda Nobunaga’s...
  • Matsumoto Travel Guide

    Matsumoto (松本) is located in central Nagano Prefecture and used to be a provincial capital from the eighth century. It was the base of the senior...
  1. Mount Omuro

    Mount Omuro (大室山 Ōmuroyama) is a volcano south of Ito City on the eastern coast of the Izu Peninsula. Extinct for 3,700 years, the cone-shaped mountain is completely covered in grass and has a circular trail around its crater mound at an altitude of 580 meters. The trail is about one kilometer in length. The Ōmuroyama Volcano Geosite is part of the Fuji-Hakone-Izu National Park (富士箱根伊豆国立公園 Fuji-Hakone-Izu Kokuritsu Kōen) that spans Yamanashi, Shizuoka, Kanagawa and parts of Tokyo. The summit of Mount Ōmuro can only be accessed by chairlift (about 5 minutes) and offers spectacular...
  2. Kakegawa Castle

    Kakegawa Castle (掛川城 Kakegawa-jō) is a hilltop (hirayama-type) castle located in Kakegawa City in western Shizuoka Prefecture. Listed in the Top 100 Castles of Japan, it is considered to be one of the finest examples of reconstructed Japanese castles. Kakegawa Castle in August 2015 History The castle was originally built in 1497 by Asahina Yasuhiro, a retainer of the Imagawa clan who ruled over Suruga Province, the central part of modern-day Shizuoka Prefecture. After Imagawa Yoshimoto (今川 義元, 1519-1560) was killed in the Battle of Okehazama in June 1560, his territories were divided...
  3. Tokugawa Art Museum

    The Tokugawa Art Museum (徳川美術館 Tokugawa Bijutsukan) is a private museum that opened its gates in 1935 and displays a large collection of artifacts of the Owari branch of the Tokugawa family. Many of these family treasures date back to Tokugawa Ieyasu and were completed by the collection of his ninth son and founder of the Owari branch, Tokugawa Yoshinao (徳川義直, 1601-1650). The entire collection comprises over 12,000 items, ten of which are designated National Treasures, including a twelfth-century copy of the Genji Monogatari, as well as fifty-nine registered Important Cultural Properties,...
  4. Osu Kannon

    Officially called Kitanosan Shinpuku-ji Hōshō-in (北野山真福寺宝生院), Ōsu Kannon (大須観音) is a Buddhist temple of the Shingon sect located in Naka Ward, central Nagoya. It was originally constructed in the early 14th century by order of Emperor Go-Daigo (後醍醐天皇 Go-Daigo-tennō, 1288-1339) in the village of Ōsu-gō, Nagaoka in Owari Province, modern-day Hashima in Gifu Prefecture. Its shrine was dedicated to Sugawara Michizane, venerated as the patron saint of scholarship and education. Initially, the temple was located between the Kiso and the Nagara rivers. As one river bank had been constructed...
  5. Atsuta Shrine

    Atsuta Shrine (熱田神宮 Atsuta-jingū) is one of the most sacred Shinto shrines in Japan, purportedly second only to Ise-jingū in Mie Prefecture. It is said to hold the sacred sword Kusanagi no Tsurugi, one of the three imperial regalia of Japan. According to tradition, the shrine was built by the consort of the legendary Prince Yamatotakeru (日本武尊 Yamato-takeru-no-mikoto), who died in 133 C.E. (the 43rd year of Emperor Keiko’s reign). The prince had been miraculously saved by this sword during his campaign to bring eastern Japan under imperial rule. The shrine received wide attention in 808...
  6. Meiji-Mura Museum

    The Meiji-Mura museum (博物館明治村 Hakubutsukan Meiji-mura) is an open-air museum located in Inuyama City, north of Nagoya, overlooking the picturesque Lake Iruka. It comprises sixty-seven buildings and structures dating mainly from the Meiji era (1868-1912): Western-inspired buildings such the main entrance of the old Imperial Hotel in Tokyo designed by Frank Lloyd Wright which has seen celebrities like Marilyn Monroe and Charlie Chapling, the cathedral of St. Francis Xavier built in Kyoto in 1890, St John’s Church, also from Kyoto and completed in 1907, next to traditional Japanese...
  7. Okazaki Travel Guide

    Okazaki City is located southeast of Nagoya in Aichi Prefecture and prospered in the Edo period (1600-1868) as a castle town and an important post-station along the Tōkaidō Road. History In the Sengoku period (1467-1568), the area of modern-day Aichi Prefecture was controlled by the Matsudaira clan, who would later be known as the Tokugawa and who in 1600 established a shogunate that would control Japan’s fate during the Edo period (1600-1868). The first fortifications were built in 1455 and later moved across the Yahagi River to the current location of Okazaki Castle by the Matsudaira....
  8. Okazaki Castle

    Okazaki Castle (岡崎城 Okazaki-jō) is located in Okazaki City in Aichi Prefecture and is famous for being the birthplace of Tokugawa Ieyasu, the founder of the Tokugawa shogunate. The current edifice, a hilltop castle, is a reconstruction of the original donjon with its annex and well-house. Okazaki Castle was originally constructed in the first half of the fifteenth century in the Myōdaiji area of Okazaki and then moved to its current location in 1531 by Matsudaira Kiyoyasu (松平清康, 1511-1536), the seventh lord of the Matsudaira clan and Ieyasu’s grandfather. The current ferro-concrete...
  9. Nagoya Castle

    Nagoya Castle (名古屋城 Nagoya-jō) was built by Tokugawa Ieyasu in 1609-14 on the site of a smaller castle taken over and renamed by Oda Nobunaga’s father, Oda Nobuhide (織田信秀, 1510-1551). The castle was abandoned by the Oda clan in 1582 and reconstructed by the victorious Ieyasu in order to ensure the security of the Tōkai region (東海地方, “Eastern Sea”). It served as the residence of Ieyasu’s ninth son, Tokugawa Yoshinao (徳川義直, 1601-1650), who was installed as the daimyo of the Owari Domain (尾張藩 Owari han), the largest Tokugawa fief apart from the shogunal land itself, and the foremost among the...
  10. Inuyama Castle

    Inuyama Castle (犬山城 Inuyama-jō) is located in the city of Inuyama north of Nagoya and is considered to be one of the oldest castles in Japan and the only one that has been in private hands until recently. While the original structure seems to date back to the mid-fifteenth century, it was Oda Nobuyasu (織田信康, d. 1542), Nobunaga’s uncle, who erected Inuyama Castle in its present location. In the years to follow, the castle was ruled by several clans. In 1584, during the Battle of Komaki and Nagakute, Toyotomi Hideyoshi occupied it with a force 120,000 men strong and used it as a...
  11. Nagoya Travel Guide

    Nagoya (名古屋市), Japan’s fourth-largest city, is the capital of Aichi Prefecture, located in central Honshū on Ise Bay, as well as the political, financial, and cultural centre of the Chubu Region, halfway between Tōkyō and Ōsaka. History Located on the fertile Nōbi Plain, the region was early settled on. Several kofun (mounded tombs) are located in the south central section of modern-day Nagoya, such as the Shiratoriryō, said to be the tomb of the mythical Prince Yamatotakeru (日本武尊), whose sword Kusanagi is still kept at Atsuta Shrine in Nagoya. The town prospered around the shrine, and...
  12. Aichi Prefecture

    Aichi Prefecture (愛知県) is located in central Honshū and borders the prefectures of Gifu and Nagano prefectures to the north, Shizuoka Prefecture to the east, the pacific Ocean to the south, and Mie Prefecture to the west. The eastern section is largely covered by the Mikawa Highland (三河高原 Mikawa-kogen). The city of Nagoya lies to the west, on the Nōbi Plain (濃尾平野Nōbi Heiya) and contains over thirty percent of the prefecture’s population. Major rivers are the Kisogawa (木曽川)and the Yahagigawa (矢作川). History Aichi Prefecture consisted in the feudal times of the Owari (尾張国 Owari no kuni) and...
  13. Nagano Prefecture

    Nagano Prefecture (長野県) is located in central Honshū and borders the prefectures of Niigata, Gunma, Saitama, Yamanashi, Shizuoka, Aichi, Gifu, and Toyama. Nagano is one of only eight landlocked prefectures. The terrain is largely mountainous. The major ranges include the Hida (飛騨山脈), the Kiso (木曽山脈), and Akaishi (赤石山脈), as well as the Mikuni (三国山) mountains. The major rivers are the Shinanogawa (信濃川), the Himegawa (姫川), the Kisogawa (木曽川), and the Tenryūgawa (天竜川). Due to the mountainous terrain and its distance from the sea, the climate is generally drier and cooler than in the...
  14. Chubu Travel Guide

    The Chūbu Region (中部地方 Chūbu-chihō) is the central part of Japan’s main island Honshū and consists of three subregions, Hokuriku on the Sea of Japan, Kōshin’etsu, the Central Highlands, and Tōkai on the Pacific Seaboard, encompassing the following prefectures: Map of Chūbu Region Hokuriku (北陸地方 Hokuriku chihō) Ishikawa Prefecture (石川県 Ishikawa-ken) Fukui Prefecture (福井県 Fukui-ken) Niigata Prefecture (新潟県 Niigata-ken) Toyama Prefecture (富山県 Toyama-ken) Kōshin’etsu (甲信越) Gifu Prefecture (岐阜県 Gifu-ken) Nagano Prefecture (長野県 Nagano-ken) Yamanashi Prefecture (山梨県 Yamanashi-ken) Tōkai (東海地方...
  15. Matsumoto Castle

    Matsumoto Castle (松本城 Matsumoto-jō) is located in Matsumoto City, Nagano Prefecture, and is one of the most famous Japanese flatland castles (平城 hirashiro). It is also called “Crow Castle” (烏城 Karasu-jō) due to the dark outer walls of its keep and the roofs that resembled spreading wings. The castle was originally called Fukashi Castle and was constructed at the beginning of the Eishō Era (永正, 1504-1521), a period of constant civil war, by the Ogasawara Clan (小笠原氏) in Shinano, who moved from Igawa to the Hayashi district. The retainers of the Ogasawara settled and built the first...
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