Ishikawa

Articles and travel guides on famous destinations in Ishikawa Prefecture

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  • Ishikawa Travel Guide

    Ishikawa Prefecture (石川県 Ishikawa-ken) is located in the Chūbu region in central Honshū and bounded by the Sea of Japan on the west and the...
  • Kanazawa Castle Park

    Kanazawa Castle Park is located next to Kenroku-en. Originally, Kenroku-en was an outlying garden of the castle before it was opened to the public...
  • Kenrokuen Garden

    Kenroku-en (兼六園, "The Garden of the Six Attributes") is one of the three Great Gardens of Japan, along with Kairaku-en in Mito and Kōraku-en in...
  • Kanazawa Travel Guide

    Kanazawa (金沢) is the capital of Ishikawa Prefecture and the political, economic, and cultural centre of the Hokuriku Region. Kanazawa developed in...
  • Nomura Samurai House

    The former residence of the Nomura family (野村家) is located in Nagamachi, the bukeyashiki or samurai quarter of Kanazawa, a quiet district...
  • Oyama Shrine Kanazawa

    Oyama Shrine (尾山神社 Oyama-jinja) is located in Kanazawa, Ishikawa Prefecture, just west of Kanazawa Castle Park. It commemorates Maeda Toshiie (前田...
  1. Nomura Samurai House

    The former residence of the Nomura family (野村家) is located in Nagamachi, the bukeyashiki or samurai quarter of Kanazawa, a quiet district characterised by its long straight mud-daub walls topped with traditional wooden slats called kobaita (小羽 板) and covered with straw mats (こも komo) in winter. The Nomura were chief retainers of the Maeda. Maeda Toshiie (前田 利家, 1538-1599), the first daimyō of Kaga Domain, bestowed a fief of one thousand koku upon Nomura Denbei Nobusada (野村伝兵衛信貞) which was later increased to 1,200 koku. Nobusada's descendants continued to serve as senior retainers and...
  2. Oyama Shrine Kanazawa

    Oyama Shrine (尾山神社 Oyama-jinja) is located in Kanazawa, Ishikawa Prefecture, just west of Kanazawa Castle Park. It commemorates Maeda Toshiie (前田 利家, 1538-1599), the first daimyō of Kaga Domain and was constructed in 1599 by his son and successor, Maeda Toshinaga, at Utatsuyama (卯辰山). For that reason, it was formerly known as Utatsu Hachimangu Shrine. In 1873, it was moved to its current location, the site of a former Maeda family residence, and renamed Oyama Shrine. The surrounding Japanese garden was designed by Kobori Enshū (小堀遠州, 1579-1647), a famous aristocrat and horticulturist, and...
  3. Kanazawa Travel Guide

    Kanazawa (金沢) is the capital of Ishikawa Prefecture and the political, economic, and cultural centre of the Hokuriku Region. Kanazawa developed in the 15th century as a de facto autonomous temple town of the Ikkō sect. In 1580, the Ikkō movement was destroyed by Sakuma Morimasa, who built Kanazawa Castle. Later, the city was ruled by the powerful Maeda clan under whose rule the arts and learning prospered. Kanazawa is still famous for its Kutani ware (九谷焼 Kutani-yaki), maki-e (蒔絵, Japanese lacquerware), and Kaga yūzen (加賀友禅, printed silk fabrics). Kanazawa was not destroyed in World War II...
  4. Kanazawa Castle Park

    Kanazawa Castle Park is located next to Kenroku-en. Originally, Kenroku-en was an outlying garden of the castle before it was opened to the public in 1871. Kanazawa Castle (金沢城 Kanazawa-jō) was the seat of the powerful Maeda clan who ruled the Kaga Domain for fourteen generations from 1583 until the end of the Edo Period. The castle was destroyed several times in battles (1592), by fires (1602, 1620, 1631, 1759, 1881) and by earthquakes (1858) but was continuously rebuilt and expanded. Due to its immense size, it was called 'the castle of 1,000 tatami'. The only original structure that...
  5. Kenrokuen Garden

    Kenroku-en (兼六園, "The Garden of the Six Attributes") is one of the three Great Gardens of Japan, along with Kairaku-en in Mito and Kōraku-en in Okayama. Kenroku-en is located in Kanazawa, Ishikawa Prefecture, and was founded in the early 17th century the Maeda clan who ruled the Kaga Domain until the Meiji Restoration. Both, Maeda Toshitsune (前田利常, 1594-1658), the second Kaga daimyō, and Maeda Tsunanori (前田綱紀, 1643-1724) are credited as the founders of the gardens. Tsunanori, the third daimyō, is said to have built the Renchiochin house in 1676. The garden was greatly expanded by the 11th...
  6. Ishikawa Travel Guide

    Ishikawa Prefecture (石川県 Ishikawa-ken) is located in the Chūbu region in central Honshū and bounded by the Sea of Japan on the west and the north, Toyama Bay and Toyama and Gifu prefectures on the east, and Fukui Prefecture on the south. It is divided into the Kaga region to the south and the Noto Peninsula to the north. There are several islets north of Noto in the Sea of Japan, the largest of which is Hegurajima. The southern part of Kaga is mostly mountainous, while the area around the capital Kanazawa forms the prefecture's largest plain. The Noto Peninsula is hilly, with an uneven...
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