1. Alright so we're back to making new exercises, this time with 「の」included. I've always thought of の as a fairly easy particle so it's not like it's really going to make the whole thing a whole lot more challenging. I definitely still need to watch out for は and が however.

    As usual, I'll be compiling the mistakes I've done and cover them in the forum.
    #1 to 4
    upload_2018-7-13_5-54-0.png

    #1: (1) の: indicates the relationship between the two nouns. (2) が:indicates the existence of something.
    #2: (1) の: indicates the relationship between the two nouns. (2) も: indicates that two subjects are of the same kind.
    #3: (1) の: indicates the relationship between the two nouns. (2) は: in a negative sentence は usually indicates a comparison, emphasis or choice.
    #4: (1) の: indicates the relationship between the two nouns. (2) が:indicates the existence of something. (3): emphasizes the action or the state described
    Comments:
    8/9

    So I got all of them except for (3). The right answer is 「が」. I'll cover my reasoning in the forums about this in order not to do the same thing twice but I already have a good idea why it's the right answer.
    #5 to 7:
    upload_2018-7-13_6-24-50.png

    #5: の: indicates the relationship between the two nouns.
    #6: (1) は: as topic marker in an affirmative sentence. (2) が: neutral/dynamic が.
    #7: (1) は: topic refocus (2) が: neutral/dynamic が.
    Comments:
    13/14

    Perfect score! Yes!
    upload_2018-7-13_6-32-56.png
    #8: (1) は: topic refocus (2) が: neutral
    #9: (1) は: as topic marker in an affirmative sentence. (2) が: indicates the subject of a relative clause. (3) が: express desire, need, ability or opinion.
    #10: (1) の: indicates the relationship between the two nouns. (2) は: as topic marker in an affirmative sentence. (3) が: Indicates the subject of the sentence when new, as-of-yet unknown information is being presented.

    Comments:
    21/22

    So that's another perfect score again. I'd say the only justification I'm unsure of is #10 (3). But I'm fairly sure.
    #11 to 13:
    upload_2018-7-13_7-1-37.png

    #11: (1) の: indicates the relationship between the two nouns. (2) は: as topic marker in an affirmative sentence. (3) も:showing similar nouns in parallel constructions.
    #12: (1) の: indicates the relationship between the two nouns. (2) の: indicates the relationship between the two nouns. (3) が: indicates the existence of something. (4) が:used in sentences as the meaning of "but". (5) の: indicates the relationship between the two nouns. (6) は: as topic marker in an affirmative sentence. (7) が: indicates the existence of something.
    #13: (1) の: indicates the relationship between the two nouns. (2) も:showing similar nouns in parallel constructions. (3) が: indicates the existence of something.
    Comments:
    32/35
    A few more mistakes here.
    #11: (2) I had to include both brothers with も. Actually come to think of it, this sentence is a bit unfair as it included に which is not a particle which is supposed to be part of the exercise yet. Oh well.
    #12: (2) The mistakes I made is that I wrote: "The children of my uncle" as my subject when in fact it was the uncle. Easy mistake to understand really.
    #14 to 18
    upload_2018-7-13_7-16-13.png
    upload_2018-7-13_7-19-11.png

    #14: (1) の: indicates the relationship between the two nouns. (2) も: indicates that two subjects are of the same kind.
    #15: (1) の: indicates the relationship between the two nouns. (2) は: as topic marker in an affirmative sentence.
    #16: (1) は: as topic marker in an affirmative sentence. (2) が: neutral/dynamic (3) も: indicates that two subjects are of the same kind.
    #17: (1) は: topic refocus (2) も: indicates that two subjects are of the same kind. Here I went out on a limb in the sense that if it rains and the wind is strong, the weather could be considered as bad. So I understood this as: is the weather also going to be bad. Let's check the answers.
    Comments:
    39/44
    I feel silly for making those mistakes. Anyway:
    #16 (3): I thought this would count as a situation where both verbs were being done and were similar enough. Anyway, (3) is just another neutral が.
    #17 (1): And that's just simple possessive の.
    #18 to 20:
    upload_2018-7-13_7-34-1.png

    #18: は: in a negative sentence, は usually indicates a comparison, emphasis or choice.
    #19: (1) が: to express desire (2) が: used at the end of a sentence to soften a request
    #20: (1) が: to express desire

    Comments
    44/48
    Another perfect round. It seems like I'm getting the hang of it. Like I said, の does make things easier as a whole.
    #21 to 25:
    upload_2018-7-13_7-40-25.png
    upload_2018-7-13_7-43-30.png

    #21: (1) も: listing... (2) も: listing... (3) が:existence
    #22: (1) が: desire
    #23: (1) は: topic refocus (2) が: desire
    #24: (1) の: indicates the relationship between the two nouns. (2) は: topic in an affirmative sentence (3) が:existence
    #25: (1) は: topic in an affirmative sentence which is already known (2) が:existence (3) も: indicates that two subjects are of the same kind.
    Comments:
    55/60
    Very good, I'm pleased.
    Regarding #23 though, I'm not sure why to be honest. Maybe it's a contrastive は? Not sure. I'll ask in the forums for this one.
    #26, 27:
    upload_2018-7-13_7-58-12.png

    #26: (1) は: topic marker in an affirmative sentence. (2) は: topic refocus (3) が: to express need, ability or opinion.
    #27: (1) の:location (2) が: existence

    Comments
    59/64
    Perfect.
    #28 to 30:
    upload_2018-7-13_8-3-22.png

    upload_2018-7-13_8-6-34.png
    upload_2018-7-13_8-9-56.png
    #28: (1) は: topic in an affirmative sentence (2) が: neutral
    #29: (1) は: topic marker in affirmative sentence (2) が: ability (3) が: conjunction (4) の: indicates the relationship between the two nouns. (5) が: ability (6) も: listing (7) も: listing
    #30: (1) が: neutral (2) も:list (3) も:list (4) が: neutral
    Comments:
    70/77=90%
    #28 (1): I guess it's a neutral が.
    #29 (5): は topic refocus. I think it made sense to say it was an ability though: "I can do most winter sports".
    #30: も: listing. Honestly, it just felt weird ending a sentence with a も particle (well being the last particle I mean).
    *
    So I went from 60% on average to 90% which is a major leap. I'm quite happy with myself. I'll be posting questions in the forum about the ones I have trouble with.
    *
    Thanks for reading!

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