Electricity rates in Japan?

Discussion in 'Japan Practical' started by RolandtheHeadless, Aug 23, 2017.

  1. I've heard Japan has high energy rates in general, and I'm somewhat familiar with how high expensive gasoline is. How much do you pay for electricity where you live?

    Here in Alaska, the average statewide rate is 17.6 cents (19.5 yen) per kWh. The US national average is 11.8 cents (13. yen) per kWh.
     
  2. johnnyG

    johnnyG 先輩

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    Had a look at a recent bill, which includes usage for the billed month and what the next bill will be, and we are paying ¥26 per kilowatt.

    There are some breakdowns--1段, 2段, 3段--where cost changes based on usage levels, but I'm not going there.

    Ours is not an "all denka" home (all electric--we also use kerosene and city gas), and I think there's a discount for those all-electric connections. Also, that service offers a heavy discount for overnight usage, and those homes recharge their "batteries" then--either heating their entire hot water for the next day, or heating that along with hot water that will be circulated for heat during the following day. (or heating one of the euro-type heaters filled with bricks, which retain the heat for the following day)

    There's probably not much solar in Alaska :emoji_wink:, but there are also guaranteed rates here for what the power company will pay you for your solar generation. It depends on the size of your system (above or below about 10 kilowatts), but you get more or less per kw (depending on system size), guaranteed for 10 or 20 years. IIRC, and I could be wrong, but I think for the smaller, under 10kw system, you get something like ¥20/kw.

    The other electricity cost is the 2% or so that they tack onto my yearly tax bill to pay for reconstruction from the 3/11 triple meltdown. Add that in as a part of the cost for power, and the per-kw rate would be higher.
     
  3. Glenski

    Glenski Just me

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  4. "There's probably not much solar in Alaska."

    Some, but you're right, not much. The sun is too low in the sky and feeble in the winter.

    But solar is the only source of electricity for my brother, who lives in the bush. He uses solar panels to recharge a bank of twelve-volt car batteries. In winter, he's reduced to one lightbulb and the pump that powers the shower. In summer, you don't really need a light up here unless you stay up past midnight.
     
  5. Mike Cash

    Mike Cash 骨も命も皆此の土地に埋めよう

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  6. johnnyG

    johnnyG 先輩

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    Hopefully, this is a mis-statement. Car batteries are not deep-cycle, which is what you typically use/need with a PV system.
     
  7. Yes, I misspoke. He uses deep-cycle marine batteries, same size and configuration of car batteries.
     
  8. Mike Cash

    Mike Cash 骨も命も皆此の土地に埋めよう

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    Maybe I should clarify that I wasn't being a smartaśs with the link to the gravity light. They're available on Amazon. I think he might like one as a back-up, if nothing else.
     
  9. No misunderstanding, Mike. I took it as a helpful suggestion.

    I have a little LED lantern that recharges its internal battery with a hand-cranked generator. Works pretty well.
     
  10. Jhnywalter

    Jhnywalter Kouhai

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    Qmark ECP1524 Good one.
    Works fine for my house. And a very economical option on the market of heaters.
    Jon
     
  11. Jhnywalter

    Jhnywalter Kouhai

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    Edit:
    About Qmark heater!
    I forgot to apply for the duration of which my time works.Already for 6 years working perfectly.
    Jon
     
  12. Uncle Frank

    Uncle Frank SECURITY-you SPAM/we BAN
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    qh.jpg Here's a 35 year old quartz heater that just won't die. The house is always chilly in the winter and we use it for my old cat to lay in front of since we don't have a fireplace.
     
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  13. Jhnywalter

    Jhnywalter Kouhai

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    Wow,really?
    Where i can buy this great old heater?E-bay?Amazon?.Thanks in advance
    And how many Watts he uses,ty.
    Jon
     
  14. Uncle Frank

    Uncle Frank SECURITY-you SPAM/we BAN
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    The company was called Boekamp , and it was made in 1980. The company is out of business sorry to say.
     
  15. Jhnywalter

    Jhnywalter Kouhai

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    I do not think that this is a problem, I think on a vintage site or E-bay.I'll try to find this amazing heater of ages :emoji_grin:
     

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