Question I know your grandfather very well/much

Discussion in '英語勉強フォーラム - Learning English' started by hirashin, May 22, 2018.

  1. hirashin

    hirashin Sempai
    Donor

    2,085
    18
    53
    Dear native English speakers,
    I have a little question.

    Do you ever say "I know your grandfather very much"?

    My intended answer to the J-E translation question is
    "I know your grandfather very well", but some students
    wrote, "I know your grandfather very much".
    Does it sound right?

    Thanks in advance.

    Hirashin
     
  2. johnnyG

    johnnyG 先輩

    916
    115
    53
    No, never.

    And instead of "very" I'd use "really":

    I know your grandfather really well.

    (tho the situation when this would occur or be true would not seem to be common)
     
  3. mdchachi

    mdchachi Moderator
    Moderator

    2,226
    197
    87
    No it doesn't sound correct to a native speaker but I would be inclined to give your students some credit for this. How are they to know it's "wrong"?
    Using a different verb the opposite is true. It's wrong to say
    I love/like your grandfather very well.
    But it sounds perfectly fine to say
    I love/like your grandfather very much.

     
  4. hirashin

    hirashin Sempai
    Donor

    2,085
    18
    53
    We've been discussing whether to give credit to the students who wrote "I know your grandfather very much".
     
  5. hirashin

    hirashin Sempai
    Donor

    2,085
    18
    53
    How about these?
    I really know your grandfather.
    I know your grandfather pretty well.
    I know your grandfather quite well.
     
  6. mdchachi

    mdchachi Moderator
    Moderator

    2,226
    197
    87
    Sounds ok to me.
     
  7. Michael2

    Michael2 Sempai

    128
    1
    18
    I would say "I really know (someone)" is a pretty colloquial expression that would only be used in certain circumstances with very subtle nuances. Putting "really" before "well" obviously quantifies "well" i.e how much you know him, but putting it before "know" qualifies "know" which can sound like you are explaining that you genuinely know him, not how much you know them. I can't imagine ever saying "I really know him" if a colleague asked me "How well do you know Dave in the office?"
     
  8. nice gaijin

    nice gaijin Resident Realist
    Moderator

    5,171
    335
    157
    #8 nice gaijin, May 24, 2018
    Last edited: May 24, 2018
    Think of it as quantity vs. quality.

    quantity: how much do you know about _____?

    quality: how well do you know _____?

    If you haven't gone over the nuance before I'd use "I know your grandfather very much (X) / well (O)" as a teaching point to show the difference between using those words. Although it's wrong to us "much," it's understandable at least and would be brushed off as a non-native expression.

    I agree, saying "I really know ____" qualifies the knowing, suggesting that maybe the listener or others don't really know the person. It's especially apparent in the question form, "Do you really know your grandfather?" which hints that there may be some secret history or double life the listener isn't aware of.
     

Share this page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice