Question I like the cookies I ate at Tom's house yesterday.

Discussion in '英語勉強フォーラム - Learning English' started by hirashin, Oct 25, 2018.

  1. hirashin

    hirashin Sempai
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    Dear native English speakers,
    does the sentence above sound off?
    A British person says, "The grammar is ok, but I think “liked” is better... you ate them, so you can’t like them now, they’re gone!"
    What do you think?

    Hirashin
     
  2. mdchachi

    mdchachi Moderator
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    It sounds ok to me. You can still like something in the present tense. Though I agree liked sounds better in this case. For something that's not consumed, present tense might sound better. e.g.
    I like the TV show we saw at Tom's house.
     
  3. Buntaro

    Buntaro 運動不足

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    #3 Buntaro, Oct 26, 2018
    Last edited: Oct 26, 2018
    A. I like the cookies I ate at Tom's house yesterday.
    B. I liked the cookies I ate at Tom's house yesterday.

    Both sentences are correct. The meanings are different.

    In example A, the speaker eats that kind of cookies regularly.

    In example B, the speaker does not eat that kind of cookies regularly. His experience with that kind of cookies may be only at Tom's house. Example B may only refer to cookies at Tom’s house.
     
  4. mdchachi

    mdchachi Moderator
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    I agree with the above sentiment.

    I wouldn't normally bring this up but since this is about English and @hirashin cares about such things, please note the egregious English mistake that Buntaro made.
    kind | Definition of kind in English by Oxford Dictionaries
    The plural of kind often causes difficulty. With this or that, speaking of one kind, use a singular construction: this kind of question is not relevant; that kind of fabric doesn't need ironing. With these or those, speaking of more than one kind, use a plural construction: we refuse to buy these kinds of books; I've given up those kinds of ideas. The ungrammatical use these kind rather than these kinds (as in these kind of questions are not relevant) has been recorded since the 14th century, and although often encountered today, it should be avoided
     
  5. hirashin

    hirashin Sempai
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    Thanks for the help, mdchachi and Muntaro.
     

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