Jobs in Japan

Discussion in 'Working in Japan' started by overlord86, Feb 3, 2002.

  1. overlord86

    overlord86 後輩

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    Hello,

    I am an American high-schooler, and I intend on living permanently in Japan after college. I have some questions for anyone who could give me some intelligent answers. For example, when should I apply for a job in Japan: before I get there, or after? How much money should I save before my trip? Will I be more desireable to employers if I have a certain degree (I intend on majoring in Computer Science or Religion.) Also, if I diligently study the language from now until graduation from college (which should be about 7-8 years) should I have enough proficiency in it to function effectively in Japanese society? That would include rigorous study in all aspects of the language, both written and spoken.

    Thank you in advance.
     
  2. thomas

    thomas Unswerving cyclist
    Admin

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    Hello, and welcome to our forum!

    I am far from being an expert, still I hope my reply will be helpful to you.

    >For example, when should I apply for
    >a job in Japan: before I get there, or after?

    Well, there are two approaches: the easiest way is to be hired from outside Japan, which saves you a lot of time chasing for jobs in situ and usually provides you with a sponsor acting as guarantor during your stay in Japan. However, most of the foreigners working in Japan take the other approach: they just arrived on a tourist visa, applied for jobs as language teacher, lecturers or similar positions, then tackled all related administrative issues (residence, working permit etc).

    > How much money should I save before my trip?

    Well, forgive me the commonplace: the more, the better. It really depends on your plans, where you are going to live, for how long, what you are going to work etc.

    >Will I be more desireable to employers if I have a certain
    >degree (I intend on majoring in Computer Science or
    >Religion.)

    Absolutely.

    >Also, if I diligently study the language from now
    >until graduation from college (which should be about
    >7-8 years) should I have enough proficiency in it to
    >function effectively in Japanese society? That would
    >include rigorous study in all aspects of the language,
    >both written and spoken.

    I believe that Japanese language skills are the most important issue if you plan to live and work in Japan, even more important than any other academic qualification. You seem to be very ambitious, so seven or eight years of Japanese studies should provide you with an excellent level of linguistic and social proficiency.

    I apologize for my brief reply. I am going to list a few online resources that will probably assist you in finding more relevant info:

    Career Cross Japan

    => http://www.japanreference.com/cgi-bin/jump.cgi?ID=2833

    Work in Japan

    => http://www.japanreference.com/cgi-bin/jump.cgi?ID=1819

    Bilingual Jobs

    => http://www.japanreference.com/cgi-bin/jump.cgi?ID=383

    Career in Japan

    => http://www.japanreference.com/cgi-bin/jump.cgi?ID=205

    Findateacher.net

    => http://www.japanreference.com/cgi-bin/jump.cgi?ID=3419

    Gaijin Pot

    => http://www.japanreference.com/cgi-bin/jump.cgi?ID=3

    HiJobs.com

    => http://www.japanreference.com/cgi-bin/jump.cgi?ID=3109

    You will be able to find more links in our Jobs & Recuitment section.

    Good luck to you! :emoji_smile:
     
  3. overlord86

    overlord86 後輩

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    Thank you for your very helpful advice! I now have an idea of what I need to prepare for, and the websites you provided will surely be of great use to me.

    Again, thank you very much!
    :chinese:
     
  4. moyashi

    moyashi Sempai

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    look into being an ELT teacher which is sponsored through the government.

    sarcasticaly you could end up anywhere!
    plus side : you might end up some where you never would have thought of going therefore gaining from such an experience.

    GEOS (english conversation school) .... hires from the states and is a pretty well known therefore possibly safer.

    Getting hired straight into a regular non-english teaching company is basically pure luck or you have something to offer and speak fluently.

    The ELT system might be worth looking into.
     

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