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Featured Moving with a spouse and Machinist Jobs?

Discussion in 'Working in Japan' started by CNCGaijin, Sep 14, 2017.

  1. CNCGaijin

    CNCGaijin Kouhai

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    How hard is it and what would the process entail to receive work visas for us both and get jobs? Her teaching english and me as a CNC Machinist/Programmer?
    I have a 2 year Technical Associates Degree in Precision Machining with a 4.0 GPA, Certified in Solidworks, Certified with the National Institute for Machining Standards, and have 4+years in my field.
    We currently live in the US and are both Native English speakers.
    We plan to learn Japanese before moving.
     
  2. Mike Cash

    Mike Cash 骨も命も皆此の土地に埋めよう

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    #2 Mike Cash, Sep 14, 2017
    Last edited: Sep 14, 2017
    You almost certainly don't qualify. What's her background?

    By the way, you don't get a work visa and then look for a job. You get aa specific job offer and then you apply for a work visa based on that.

    What is your plan for learning Japanese and how long do you expect it to take?
     
  3. CNCGaijin

    CNCGaijin Kouhai

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    High School Education.
     
  4. Mike Cash

    Mike Cash 骨も命も皆此の土地に埋めよう

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    You're both S.O.L., unless that means she's a high school teacher.
     
  5. CNCGaijin

    CNCGaijin Kouhai

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    We had planned to learn it over the course of a year or two and get jobs through abroad agencies as English teachers (JET, altmoot, etc) for the first year then look for other job opportunities while already living in Japan. I posted my credentials since Japanese employers seem to like certifications.
    Long term, I would want to work in my field.
     
  6. Mike Cash

    Mike Cash 骨も命も皆此の土地に埋めよう

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    You have to satisfy Immigration requirements first before you worry about impressing employers. I don't think either of you can satisfy the Immigration requirements. You certainly don't, not for being a machinist, anyway. I'm pretty sure she doesn't, but even if she does somehow clear that hurdle then the lack of a college degree pretty much makes her unemployable here as an English teacher.

    You guys need to get college degrees or think of something to do that doesn't involve emigrating to Japan.

    I'm not knocking you guys personally. You have completed more education than I have and she has completed as much as I have.
     
  7. Glenski

    Glenski Just me

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    To elaborate on Mike's reply..................

    Work visas require a college degree (not technical school). As Mike wrote, you apply for the job, and after you are accepted, then you apply for the work visa (along with the employer, who must provide documentation to prove he is a valid one and has a contract for you).

    JET program doesn't take people without college degrees, either.

    The certifications you have are nice enough, but I don't recall 4 years being enough to override the lack of a college degree. You might want to contact an immigration lawyer to see if he thinks it's feasible to combine a 2-year tech degree with 4 years of work as an equivalent substitute. If so, and you are successful, you could take your wife here on a dependent visa, and she could work part-time wherever someone felt she is suitable. To be honest, even with a dep. visa in her hand, I don't think most employers even in the teaching field of eikaiwa would look twice at her. Just not enough education even though the dep. visa makes her legal. You never know, though.

    Also, she should keep in mind (and you, too, since you indicated you'd also be willing to get teaching work prior to a job in your field) that teaching English may sound like a piece of cake, but it's actual work. I taught eikaiwa for 4 years, then HS for another 4, and since then I've been at a university for almost 12 years, all teaching English. The eikaiwa gigs are paying lower and lower now. Get on the ESL Cafe website and ask the teachers and wannabes there for the most up to date on the ground status on such work. It's pretty pitiful as far as I know in terms of money.

    But unless you get lucky with immigration for work in your field, you're not going to get a teaching job.

    Just curious...how old are each of you? And, do you have a timeline for coming here? And, why Japan?

    Mike asked about your Japanese skills, and you said "We plan to learn Japanese before moving." Uh, that's too vague. Speaking, reading, writing, and to what level? I added my question above about timelines to address Mike's (unanswered) question about when you plan to come, by the way.
     
  8. CNCGaijin

    CNCGaijin Kouhai

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    I get free college where I work and intend to finish my degree in Engineering beforehand. (I've already previously knocked out General Education requirements for such)

    I found a job posting in Miyazaki that's only requirement was Native Level English and theyd pay for training which would work for her. Obviously this wouldn't be available come time for us to actually do this; however, I would wager to guess that similar offerings would be present.

    We are well aware of the fact that it is indeed 'work'. I make twice what the average ALT makes on the high end currently. We are willing to take a dock in pay to achieve our dreams. Besides, teaching kids sounds like fun, especially younger ones.

    I'm 26 and she's 19. Within the next ten years, we plan to save enough to buy a 4 room house with full ownership rights outright when we are able. (Also helps to have a fall back in case of employment gaps) I've already done a small amount of research into whats needed to get a mortgage in Japan, own land, etc such as acquiring permanent residence after 10 years. We are going to visit Japan next year, and then decide if we want to take the plunge. Japan is beautiful, Japan is weird, Japan is like a childhood dream. Retiring somewhere in Hokkaido in a home with Tatami mats and paper walls is a dream we share.

    While attending college for my Engineering Degree I would take Japanese as an elective and I would like to become fluent in reading, writing, and speaking it or atleast to a conversational level. When is above.

    Sorry for the long reply.
    We are fully aware of the challenges, we just want to know the steps. Also, can you show me the COE requirements, I can't seem to locate them on the Immigration Bureau's website.
     
  9. CNCGaijin

    CNCGaijin Kouhai

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    Also I don't know if this would be a hurdle but, I currently work in my field for the US Gov.
     
  10. Glenski

    Glenski Just me

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    If she doesn't get a dependent visa, it doesn't matter one bit what the employer's requirements are. Work visas require that college degree.

    You might have mentioned this earlier. Good. That'll take care of a major visa requirement hurdle for you.

    That's the one group I avoid, but that's a personal preference. Would be interesting to know what you think such teaching is like, and where you learned it.

    Sounds like you've done some good leg work on stuff here so far, and I highly recommend that visit you mentioned. I'm sure you must realize visiting is not equivalent to living and working, but at least you'll get a taste for something here. Keep that caveat in mind.

    As for Hokkaido, that's where I have lived since 1998. Any specific questions, just ask.

    Visa requirements. Go here. Change the top right menu item to 英語 to make it easier to read、click 表示 . There used to be a much better site, but this is the best I have found in recent years.
    This link on Labour Laws may also eventually prove useful.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  11. CNCGaijin

    CNCGaijin Kouhai

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    According to the site mentioned above, she could just receive a TEFL Certification and acquire one.
     
  12. CNCGaijin

    CNCGaijin Kouhai

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    Also reading further in, it appears Technical/Vocational Colleges are as applicable as any other university. Sure, I'd be overlooked compared to having a BS in Mech. Engineering with just a 2 year technical degree.
    "
    イ 当該技術若しくは知識に関連する科目を専攻して大学を卒業し、又はこれと同等以上の教育を受けたこと。
    (a) The applicant shall have graduated from university, having majored in a subject relating to such skills or knowledge, or shall have acquired an education equivalent thereto.


    ロ 当該技術又は知識に関連する科目を専攻して本邦の専修学校の専門課程を修了(当該修了に関し法務大臣が告示をもって定める要件に該当する場合に限る。)したこと。
    (b) The applicant shall have completed a specialized course of study at a vocational school in Japan, majoring in a subject relating to the skills or knowledge (limited to cases where he/she has fulfilled the requirements designated in a public notice by the Minister of Justice relating to such completion).


    ハ 十年以上の実務経験(大学、高等専門学校、高等学校、中等教育学校の後期課程又は専修学校の専門課程において当該技術又は知識に関連する科目を専攻した期間を含む。)を有すること。
    (c) The applicant shall have at least 10 years' practical experience (including the period during which he/she majored in a subject relating to such skills or knowledge at a university, college of technology, high school, the latter course of a secondary educational school or a specialized course of study at a vocational school). "

    (Sorry for the double post. I will edit my posts in the future. I got excited...)
     
  13. Glenski

    Glenski Just me

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    Where exactly do you see that? I think you are incorrect. She is going to have to get a Specialist in Humanities work visa.

    You, on the other hand, might get in as is, like I've already stated. However, please confirm this with immigration, your local embassy/consulate, or an immigration lawyer first.
     
  14. Mike Cash

    Mike Cash 骨も命も皆此の土地に埋めよう

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    I would suggest that you also try to obtain some sort of TEFL certification while you are working on finishing up your engineering degree. You might be able to wriggle your way into an English teaching position at a technical/vocational school for machinists or others going into the manufacturing trades.
     
  15. Glenski

    Glenski Just me

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    Was this the job in Miyazaki? She will still need a college degree unless you can sponsor her. And to have a 19-20 year old teaching adults (usually in their 50s) is not really going to fly for either party, especially with no experience. And "to liaison with parents and clients in Japanese at a basic conversational level" is not as easy as it might sound. "Must reside in Japan" usually means don't even think about applying until you are here and already set up with housing from a previous job. Just a heads up on some things.
     
  16. johnnyG

    johnnyG 先輩

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    With that background you might try getting on as a contractor via DOD working on one of the US bases. You could continue in your field (which would be my advice) and also sponsor your wife. Considering your personal situation, the pay and other conditions would be far better than English teaching.
     
  17. Takichan

    Takichan 後輩

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    I'm only 20 with a high school degree so I can't comment on the work plans or English teaching. All I can offer is it doesn't really matter how much Japanese you study here in the US. It's not the same. I fortunately was able to live in Japan for two years and would now consider myself fluent. Plan on taking JLPT in December for 2 or 1, still not sure. But I can testify my man, that it is near impossible to know all the Japanese you need to know to be successful over there while staying over here and studying. I wish you the best my man, I too, dream of living out my days in Japan.

    BTW I have some friends in Miyazaki. One is an American who runs an English preschool with his Japanese wife. He is like, better at Japanese than Japanese people lol its ridiculous. He's lived there longer than he has in the states now. Plus Miyazaki has super good oranges. I've never been but lived in the neighboring prefecture Kagoshima. It's suer beautiful down there.
     
  18. musicisgood

    musicisgood Sempai
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    It's great to have a dream like that. But at the moment there are over 10000 refugees here that can legally work for 6 months waiting for their approval of refugee claim. Someone mentioned the military base, that would be a good start and chances are the employer will help with housing. Housing around the military bases are no longer cheap.
     

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