Regarding Shinto shrines

Discussion in 'All Things Japanese' started by Lomaster, Apr 30, 2016.

  1. Lomaster

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    First of all i'd be grateful if someone gives me a cue about the newest Shinto shrine in Japan (i.e. the date of establishment being the most recent) The one i managed to find is Tsubaki Grand Shrine of America (founded 1987) There are probably much more recent shrines out there in Japan.

    But my main question is: what's the procedure of establishing a Shinto shrine? Where can i read more about it (preferably in English, since i expect it to be a vast text with lots of uncommon vocab, which would be pain in the *** with my current level)
    I'm interested in the subject since i imagined some new territories being settled by Japanese (those new volcanic islands for instance) Although i'm aware that the idea is rather preposterous, with depopulation of 田舎 taken into account.
     
  2. Majestic

    Majestic 先輩

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    Have you looked on this site?
    JINJA HONCHO - Association of Shinto Shrines
    It is the central authority for Shinto shrines. It may not help you in finding out how a shrine is established (I don't think there is a manual for such thing).
     
  3. Toritoribe

    Toritoribe 禁漁期
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    A quick google search result says that there is no "new" shrine that belongs to 神社本庁 at least recently, except 分祀 cases such like Tsubaki Grand Shrine of America you mentioned.
    This is not for a new shrine of shintō, but there is a manual/law to establish a new religion.
    宗教法人法 第二章 設立
     
  4. Lomaster

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    The amount of information on any subject is surprisingly scarce at that site.

    Not something i’m interested in right now.

    Now that's interesting. In fact that solves half of my question. Thanks, Toritoribe.

    I'll carry on hypothesizing about settling shrineless areas. If i come across any interesting information - i'll probably share it here.
     
  5. Mike Cash

    Mike Cash 骨も命も皆此の土地に埋めよう

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    Good luck with that.

    By way of comparison, the number of convenience stores is about 54,000, in this country where you can't throw a rock without hitting a convenience store.

    I feel fairly certain the number of shrines doesn't include all the ones people put up at companies, in their yards at home, along the roadside, on mountain trails, on the top of urban buildings, or just about anywhere else you can imagine. If torii were kryptonite, Superman couldn't get within a million miles of Japan.
     
  6. Lomaster

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    That's what i'm driving at. Every settled area has shrines nearby, so in order to imagine a shrineless area - it has to be an unsettled one. Actually your reply helped me envision how the process would unfold. Those roadside/mountain trail type of shrines would probably be laid up for a time being.
    After all, that's the way it used to be before Buddhism influenced Shinto, bringing about buildings as places of worship (some piece of helpful information from JINJA HONCHO - Association of Shinto Shrines so thank you for the link anyway, Majestic)
     
  7. Toritoribe

    Toritoribe 禁漁期
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    Wait, are you referring to shintō shrine, aren't you? There seems to be misunderstanding about the term "shintō".

    神道 - Wikipedia

    神社神道 - Wikipedia

    Shintō buildings have nothing to do with Buddhism.
     
  8. Lomaster

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    Originally I was referring to shintō shrines in the scope of 神社神道. But after Mike's post i consider the scope beyond 神社神道 as well. To put it simply - i'm trying to imagine how a hypothetical newly settled territory would develop shintō -wise.

    Now that's confusing. JINJA HONCHO - Association of Shinto Shrines | About Shrines - Shinto Shrines and Japanese People states that:
    "In ancient times, rites were primarily performed outdoors and it was rather rare to have a house-style building as a place for performing rites. In those days, a plot of purified land was chosen and roped off in a square. Following the ceremony a stand of trees was erected as an object to which kami were invited. However, when Buddhism was introduced to Japan, people began worshipping images of Buddha placed in buildings. It is thought that Shinto, being influenced by this style, began to enshrine the kami spirit in a building and this became the popular custom as time went on."
     
  9. Toritoribe

    Toritoribe 禁漁期
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    It's just one of hypotheses.
    神社 - Wikipedia

    神社本庁 | 神道への誘い

    There are many new residential development areas(新興住宅地) where shrine doesn't exist. The most residents wouldn't care whether they have their shrine in the area or not.
     
  10. Lomaster

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    Had a look at 田園調布 and 本町 (守谷市) as examples of 新興住宅地. The former has a shrine, the latter has at least four. But i guess you're right about most residents not giving two hoots about lack of shrines in the vicinity.
     
     
  11. Toritoribe

    Toritoribe 禁漁期
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    本町 (守谷市) - Wikipedia

    You assumed the whole area of 本町 is 新興住宅地, right? Actually, the three of the four shrines are in the north area. You should pick up for instance みずき野, the town next to 本町, as an example of 新興住宅地 instead of 本町. The more important point is, however, which is older, the shrine or the development. Don't you think of any possibility that the development was done just near old shrines?

    田園調布 - Wikipedia

    西守稲荷神社

    As you can see above, 田園調布 started to be developed in 1918 and started to sell in 1923. 西守稲荷神社 was moved to the place in 1925, but it's not for the people in the new development area but for the residents who lived there before the development. I don't think a hundred-years-ago is "new" in the first place, though.

    It seems to me that you are misunderstanding the function/origin of shrines. Shrines are not indispensable facilities to the residents in a region (well, at least recently).
     
  12. Lomaster

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    Right, i did.

    Certainly i thought of such possibility, but that's irrelevant to what i'm trying to elicit here. My point is - there is a shrine at a distance acceptable enough to go to there on 初詣 and various 縁日 and 祭り, for every settlement. Wouldn't that be depressing if one had to take a two-hour ferry trip just to make a wish and grab omikuji?
     
  13. Toritoribe

    Toritoribe 禁漁期
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    Most Japanese people, including me, would go to shrine only when 初詣. It's 正月, so it's not always a shrine nearby home. It might be the one in hometown during 里帰り, or could be a famous big shrine like 明治神宮. 祭り can be done even without a shrine. Some 新興住宅地 actually do that.
    When it's necessary, people would go to the appropriate shrine for the purpose even if it's far away. My uncle was a shipowner and engaged in fishery. He went to 金刀比羅宮 in 四国 almost every year.
     
  14. Mike Cash

    Mike Cash 骨も命も皆此の土地に埋めよう

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    Have you ever watched has Japanese television around the end of the year? The larger shrines run commercials.

    I think coming from a culture with churches may be interfering with your understanding of the nature and function of shrines.
     
  15. Lomaster

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    I see. Just like students make pilgrimages to 北野天満宮 hoping to succeed in exams, seafarers go to 金刀比羅宮 to petition for safe voyages .

    Never heard of that before. But sounds like something to be expected from the Japanese (in a good way)

    Perhaps.
     
  16. SMiles

    SMiles SMiles

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    I noticed that the Jinjo Honcho Association of Shinto Shrines site mentions that there is a course one must take and pass to become a Shinto Priest... but it doesn't provide any other information. If anyone could provide more details I would be grateful. I would also be curious if there are any issues with an American becoming a Shinto Priest.
     
  17. Toritoribe

    Toritoribe 禁漁期
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